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Grzimek Family and the Serengeti: the men who counted the wildebeests

Few conservationists have had such a lasting and public relationship with the Serengeti as Bernhard and Michael Grzimek. You might have heard about father-and-son team and their award-winning documentary “The Serengeti Shall Not Die” or seen a faded picture of their zebra-striped Dornier aircraft. Let’s take a closer look at the men who counted the wildebeests.

Ol Doinyo Lengai: the Mountain of God that breathes snow

Just short of 3000 metres above sea-level, Ol Doinyo Lengai, the sacred mountain of the Masai towers above the remote plains south of Lake Natron in Tanzania’s Arusha region.The local Masai respect it as holy Mountain of God and home to their God Ngai, geologists study the mountain for its unique lava and travellers attempt to capture its mystic aura in photographs.

Here’s why Tanzania will always top the safari charts

Tourism in Tanzania took a bit of a dip back in 2015, in part due to largely misinformed fears about Ebola (which was almost entirely limited to a few countries in West Africa). But Tanzania’s numerous stunning wild spaces and tourist attractions certainly didn't lose any of their shine, and with the fear of Ebola snuffed out, arrival numbers were up by 10% in 2016 compared to the previous year.

See Tanzania at its finest on Instagram

Sometimes, words can struggle to do justice to the awe-inspiring landscapes, the iconic wildlife, the fascinating people, the interesting history, the vibrant culture, and the overall feeling of Tanzania. So we thought we'd show you the very best of our beloved Tanzania on Instagram instead, and let the country speak for itself through these fabulous images.

Getting to know the most well-known people of Tanzania – a visit to the Olpopongi Maasai Village

The Maasai are probably the most well-known of the about 130 peoples in Tanzania. They live a seminomadic life and are known to uphold their traditions and customs despite modern life’s influences. Some Maasai villages welcome visitors to introduce them to their way of life. The Olpopongi Maasai Village is one of them.

Stone Town, a UNESCO World Heritage Site – 800 Zanzibaris preserve their heritage

The tropical island in the Indian Ocean is known for its idyllic beaches, breath-taking diving spots, stunning nature and rich spice culture. Relaxation, that's the main reason for a holiday on the island. The name “Zanzibar” in itself awakens dreams of a tropical paradise.

Maasai Huts- who builds them and how?

The Maasai are one of the best known tribes in Tanzania. By nature, they are nomadic livestock herders and move to greener pastures as need be. Cows play an extremely vital role in their day to day lives and the Maasai believe that God gave the them all the cattle in the world and that cattle represents a sacred bond between man and God. There is a strong hierarchy amongst the Maasai and each individual has his or her place within the community.

The Wa-arusha tribe and their traditional houses

Recently on a cultural tour on the slopes of Mt. Meru, I got the chance to learn about the Wa-arusha tribe and how they live. The tribe were of Pare origins who used to live in the Kilimanjaro area. They first arrived in the now Arusha area in the 1830’s. Most of the people at the time there were Maasais. The Wa-arusha tribe took on a lot of the Maasai traditions but they are still very different.

Mbege- a social beer of the Chagga tribe

The Chagga tribe originates from the foothills of the highest mountain in Africa, Mt. Kilimanjaro. Like many other tribes they have a unique tradition and that is mbege. Mbege is an alcoholic drink made from ripe bananas and sprouted millet powder. Some call it banana beer but it has a more wine-like taste to it. Mbege is traditionally only brewed by women and it is a time-consuming and very hands on process.

Rock art paintings of Kondoa

Red elongated people, giraffes, eland and hunting scenes. These are just some of the subjects in a little-known UNESCO World Heritage Site in Tanzania. In central Tanzania near the little village of Kolo (250km southwest of Arusha) are the Kondoa Irangi rock paintings.